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. what does the evolution of life on our planet tell us about the likelihood that alien civilizations exist? in the second of a two-part series, we will ask one of the originators of the dark matter theory, dr. joel primack and nancy ellen abrahams. >>> this is the second session with two extraordinary people, nancy abrahams wosay lawyer, a song writer, a spouse, and the coauthor of this volume, which is quite breathtaking. the view from the center of the universe. discovering our extraordinariy place in the cosmows. a new book. -- cosmos. highly placed and the coauthor is sitting right here, his name is joel preand he is one of the world's most successful and recognized cosmonthlygists, astro first cysts. and this is a tour of the universe benefiting by the extraordinary breakthroughs of a series of telescopes, the head of which is the leading telescope is the hubble telescope which is still functioning. now, the hubble is a product of nasa. so you must have high regard for nasa? is that deminished in any way? >> all of us scientists are enormously grateful for the government of the
. ♪ >>> welcome. i'm bob abernathy. it's good to have you with us. another historic event for pope benedict the 16th this week. his four-day visit to the yinged kingdom. king henry viii broke ties with the roman catholic church almost 500 years ago. as kim reports, benedict's trip has not been without controversy. >> pope benedict went to the uk at the invitation of queen elizabeth ii, the official head of england. the only was john pall ii in 1982. he was greeted with an outpouring of affection. pope benedict has faced outright protests. one major issue is outrage over the clergy sex abuse crisis still swirling over many parts of europe. at the beginning of the trip, benedict admitted the church was not quick and decisive to take the necessary measures to combat the crisis. another is between roman catholics and the anglo-american community. last october the vatican made it easier for disaffected anglocans to become catholic. a highlight is the trip is the -- but perhaps the biggest challenge has been making the case for faith and a nation known for growing secularism. throughout the trip benedic
physicists to understand the very essence of the universe. what does science tell us about our place in the cosmos? where do we fit in to the universe? in the first of a two-part series, we'll ask the authors of the view from the center of the universe, dr. joel primack and nancy ellen abrahams. if. for such a small if i live to a hundred. if social security isn't enough. if my heart gets broken. if she says yes. we believe if should never hold you back. if should be managed with a plan that builds on what you already have. together we can create a personal safety net, a launching pad, for all those brilliant ifs in the middle of life. you can call on our expertise and get guarantees for the if in life. after all, we're metlife. >>> welcome to both of you. pleasure to see you. >> thank you. >> your book, the view from the center of the universe, the subtitle is, discovering our extraordinariy place in the cosmos, is a tour of the universe. it's ambitious and i think it's fulfilled. and it's great to have you here. >> delighted to be here. thank you very having us. >> the assumptions
& ethics "newsweek"ly is provided by -- >>> welcome. it's good to have you with us. as the country observes the ninth anniversary of the september 11th terrorist attacks, there's been an extraordinary national conversation about the challenges of religious diversity and the boundaries of tolerance. there were protests and condemnations from around the world over a small independent florida church's threatened plan to burn the koran. secretary of state hillary clinton called the plan disrespectful and disgraceful. and general david petraeus, the top u.s. and nato commander in afghanistan and defense secretary robert gates said the act could endanger american troops. the debate came on top of another controversy over plans to build an islamic cultural center near the site of ground zero in new york. at a news conference on friday, president obama called for religious tolerance. >> we have to make sure that we don't start turning on each other, and i will do everything that i can as long as i'm president of the united states to remind the american people that we are one nation under god and we
're already important for us. because many conflicts are around us. so therefore our attempt, our word and our insistence to contribute to the solution of the problems is appreciated. >> couric: and the prime minister of the palestinian authority, salam fayyad. >> it's one that's based definitely on dealing violence out of the equation for sure. that's our interest. that's how we defined it. from our point of view. it happens to be consistent with obligations that we took on the road map and going back to 1993. it's in our best interest, we're not doing no one else a favor but ourselves when we subscribe to nonviolence. as a really key component to what we have to do to get to freedom. >> couric: a program note: our interview with the c.e.o. of google, eric schmidt, will be seen at a later date. tonight, the president of turkey and the prime minister of the palestinian authority when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: abdullah gul is here, he's the president of turkey, a key u.s. ally and nato member, turke
to what the u.s. has with china, with the european union. but the potential is huge. >> rose: and we conclude with one of the most interesting entrepreneurs in all of china, he is jack ma. his company is alled alibaba. >> core competence of our companies, we have 20,000, grow from 18 people, now 20,000 people. and we focus a lot on the making sure the culture, everybody works for helping others instead of just making money. and we believe different from wall street, we believe customer number one, employee two, shareholder three. >> rose: customer one, employee, two, shareholder three? >> yes, again, this is my religion. >> rose: russia and the world, china and technology when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama came to office promising to reset relations with russia. he and russian president dmitry medvedev appeared to form a personal bond. they have since signed a nuclear arms reduction treaty-- now waiting to be ratified by the u.s. senate. russia, a long-time ally of iran voted
to the u.s. military. it has seen some of the most ferocious fighting. nearly a third of british fatalities have occurred there. this latest transfer of responsibility is bound to raise a question -- are the british pulling out with their tails between their legs or is this simply a sensible deployment now that there are more u.s. troops on the ground. our correspondent reports now from sangin. >> five bloody summers in hellman's. 337 british lives lost and almost a third of all deaths happened here, in the most dangerous district of all, sangin. with the last journalist to visit, and hand over to u.s. forces. a time to reflect an for hard questions about the sacrifices that have been made. >> it has to be hard moment -- would be completely wrong or almost immoral of me not to sort of question what is we are doing. it is a sort of natural reaction every time there is a regrettable loss of life. but i think those sorts of moments could be overcome. >> we joint british and u.s. marines and to prepare for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons. >> i
and reward system involves several different brain regions that communicate using chemical signals called neurotransmitters. the this circuit helps us to repeat the behaviors that make us happy while avoiding those that make us miserable. but as any adult knows, pleasure is not always good for you. tonight we'll also explore particularly dangerous forms of pleasure-seeking, addiction. long considered to be a moral weakness, addiction is now understood to be a biological disease. finally, we will explore the role that emotions play in decision-making and social interaction. next month, in part two of the emotional brain, we will turn our focus to negative emotions such as fear and anxiety. joining us tonight, a group of scientists who have devoted their lives to understanding the emotional brain. daniel salzman, he studies how the brain assigns an emotional value to the information that it receives from the five senses. he is an assistant professor of sky tri and neuroscience at columbia university. wolfram schultz. he studies how the brain's reward systems affect decision-making and learn
words mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. th
, there is a bogyman around washington. european style socialism, and it is coming to get us. there are a lot of people who say you want european-style socialism, which causes me to wonder and tremble -- it is it going to be like england? germany? france? the most insidious thing is to build europe's government system and to some big threat to the united states. 27 nations in the european union alone is like any other part of the world. some things are better than others, some work better than others. some things are a threat to the way we do things here if we were to adopt them, and there is not much chance of that. they would feel the way we do things a threat to the way they do things. the differences -- rather than being in a bunker worrying about the dreadful socialism coming across the atlantic, we should really just look and see what works better and incorporate it. we always have done, even the language we speak here, coming from over there. actually, two languages spoken here come from over there. let's take a look at other countries, let's see what works, and improve them if necessary. we do
joined british and u.s. marines as they prepared for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons and reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show us what they achieved, all the project have -- how the province has prospered and how much safer and has become, but this is what we saw. [gunshots fired] a brutal fight for much of the day. it does not happen much anymore, but it shows the taliban battling coalition troops. and now america must finish the job britain started. no british troops at this time, they have faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about. without someone having been there, you cannot describe the smells, the sites, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to be there and, the emotions -- to have a true understanding of what people here go through. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet mellon for the troops. there happen -- they are happy to be going, but their regret the mission is far from over. >> the amount of effort, time, lives lost, i feel a little h
consequence and very impressive company. and social information will be used by google and by others, i should add, to make the quality of the results, the quality of the experience that much better. the pore we foe about what your friends do with your permission, and i need to say that about 500 times, we can actually use that to improve the experience you have of getting information that you care about. in our case what we're actually do something building social information into all of our products. so it won't be a social network the way people think of facebook but rather social information about who your friends are, people that you interact with. and we have various ways in which we will be collecting that information. >> we continue with the film wall street money never sleeps with the director all i ver stone and two of the jars, josh brolin and shia labeouf. >> the 2 o 008 market is more difficult to understand with credit default swaps and insurance and all that stuff. but we made it a background. that's the way we treated it. we treated the crisis, it's all
will give you the headlines when we managed to rebound. >> thank you very much. let us take a look at some of the other stories making headlines around the world. president barack obama is back a new company tax breaks in an attempt to regain the initiative as a midterm poll's loom. he is lobbying -- lobbying congress to let companies in the u.s. write off investment costs until 2011. what do business people think of this measure? a report from new jersey. all right -- let us go to washington now and talk to jake sherman. thank you for being with us. it really is not a particularly good time to be this particular president of the united states at the moment, at the polls are right. >> no, absolutely not. as you just mentioned. it is very difficult for this president. congress has been a lot of money revamping health care, saving family banks and other things that have gone along with the economic calamity we have been experiencing. and there is just not an appetite -- many did not see this appetite to spend more money, even if put tens of -- is potentially it could create jobs down the roa
leaders have been getting down to business in their peace talks. that is the sentiment of the u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. the israeli president said there was no alternative to this peace process. our middle east correspondent is following the negotiations in jerusalem. he joins us now. >> even though details of very thin on the ground, the mood music surrounding these talks is said to be good. especially the americans talking up progress. of course, the americans, the israelis, and the palestinians are meeting here in jerusalem later today. >> today, mrs. clinton met with a man who ever witnessed -- a man who has witnessed every stage of the talks. despite that, israel's el this statemeneldest statement said -- >> i do not believe you can solve it in one or two meetings. >> i believe they are serious about reaching an agreement that results in two states living side by side in peace and security. that outcome is not only in the interest of both israelis and palestinians, it's in the interest of the united states and people everywhere. this is the time and these are t
turned us into a zombie nation? or should we just go with the flow and embrace the brave new world of mood control? we'll ask new york magazine journalist ariel levy and washington psychiatrist dr. brian doyle. >> a.d.m. the nature of what's to come. >> welcome. ariel levy, you authored a cover story for "new york magazine" which we see here "what are you on?" and you described new york today to -- you say sound the alarm, there is a new drug epidemic in town and most of the city wants in on it. in certain circles of new york, it is regular table conversation. we have entered the golden age of self-medication. drugs have become like hair products or cosmetics. this is brain styling, not mind altering, and you have a serious point to make there, but what is the extent of what you see going on in new york? >> well, i mean, i think new york is the same town that brought you woody allen and brought you everybody having a psychiatrist. there not a great deal of stigma to being neurotic in new york. it is accepted to the point of maybe being desirable in certain circles. i think now that
europe faces us see us strikes as governments bareback cherished benefits. bbc news, paris. >> the spanish prime minister and has called on a basket separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. -- of basque separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. mozambique has reversed its decision to raise bread prices by 30%. food riots last week left 13 dead. bread will now be sold at its previous price of 14 cents. every year since 1998, more than 30,000 japanese people have killed themselves. japan's health ministry estimates cases of suicide and depression caused the economy $32 billion last year. the government has launched a task force to address the problem. more than two weeks of political deadlock have ended in australia with confirmation that labor's julia gillard will continue as prime minister, would be backing, at last, of to independenct mp's. she has been near west possible majority. nick bryant has this. >> it is like the finale of a tv reality show, with the winner kept a closely-guarded secret until announced live on television. it came down to two of the
the declaration of independence, the constitution and -- >> u.n. declaration? >> and the bill the rights, the u.s. charter. he was also interested in the revolutionary period. washington -- was fascinated to spend sometime with washington's documents. he knew a great deal about american history. he also knew a great deal about the american revolution, for example, that we like so many other democracies began with support from other countries. we began with french support. they have coalition support in iraq. he was well aware of the time that it took the us. to go from revolution to government, over a decade. he was interested in lincoln and the civil war. we talked a lot about lincoln and saw lincoln documents. then he had a very surprised q. he wanted to see documents of the precedence apparently really fascinates him, john quincy adams so we showed -- >> did he explain his interest? >> well, he didn't beyond the point that he was fascinated with the father son aspect of this adams senior -- bush senior, bush junior. >> i see. did he comment on anything like transparency of his from the documen
working properly the brain performs sophisticated tasks smoothly and easily. it allows us to move and to speak and to interact with our surroundings, requiring only minimal amount of effort. but when the brain is damaged, its true complex sit revealed. our subject this evening is the neurological disorders. these include parkinson's disease. stroke. huntington's disease and spinal chord injury. these conditions have taught us more about our brain than any other kind of brain disease. through parkinson's we have learned about movement. through stroke we have learned about speech. and through spinal cord injuries we have learned how thoughts give rise to actions. neurological diseases have been a topic of research for sent yees but-- century bus only recently have we developed effective treatments. this evening we will meet a group of scientists who have developed ways to repair or bypass the disordered brain. john done o hew. his work allowed paralyzed patients to move and communicate using only their thoughts and a machine called a brain computer interface. he is a professor at br
with james elmore. he is out with the new memoir. we are glad to have joined us. join us for a ethan bronner air and james l. roy, coming up. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: u.s. special envoy george mitchell is on an emergency mission to rescue the latest efforts for peace in the region. i am joined from jerusalem by ethan bronner. thanks for your time, a bit too heavy on the program tonight, sir pitt >> is a pleasure to be here. tavis: let me start with the obvious, the thing that has raised this level of concern so high tonight on the scale. israel, on sunday, allowed the moratorium on jewish settlements being bui
and it cost us too much of our money, so often, too much borrowed money. but where to cut it and what are the irrelevant programs? that gets to be a lot more difficult. all i can think of is little things that we expect the federal government is doing something about, and then we are shocked when we find out that they are not doing something about it. we expected, for example, in the gulf of mexico, that the government had amazing undersea capacity to shot that well down itself. it does not -- to shut the well down itself. does not. the snake and in the houston rivers and other asian imports, we expect the government to do something about it. likewise, we expect to do something about the cavendish banana that we have eaten all our allies. it is actually a clone. -- all our lives here it is actually a clone. it happened months ago with another banana which is long away. but we think we always have bananas -- the bees are stressed and dying, we hope that the government is studying it. bats are dying, and we hope the government is studying it. these are not trivial. any large disappearan
and celebrate the explorer in all of us. >> and now "bbc newsnight." >> will he be judged in how he deals with [unintelligible] he was a child molester and drug addict and a leading figure in the catholic church. why was a vatican investigation halted? whoyman's guide to the man the theory that makes guide any relevance. >> i answer questions about life and everything. >> we explore the cultural legacy of the most talked-about bed. >> is that a hot water bottle or are you pleased to see me? the waterbed, is it the betting choice for the future? -- bedding choice? >> next week's visit to great britain by the pope is historic and highly controversial. he ran the vatican department charged with investigating miscreant priests. defenders say he was thwarted in major cases by another influential cardinal and his predecessor. peter marshall reports on inquiries into the most serious of these cases. >> what is truth? truitt sets you free. god is truth. -- trysta sets you free. sexual abuse in the church has been hidden for many years. what has been the role of joseph? first as cardinal and now a
different? steve assesses the chances. >> all together now, an ambitious u.s. president and the middle east leaders his urging to walk the path of peace. they have come to talk face-to- face for the first time in 20 months, and regions is that he is here in good faith. >> we will spare no effort, and we will work diligently, and tirelessly to ensure that these negotiations meet the goals and objectives in dealing with all the issues. >> president abbas, you're my partner in peace. it is up to less with the help of our friends to conclude the agonizing conflict between our peoples, and to afford them a new beginning. >> mr. abbas condemned the killing on tuesday of four jewish settlers on the was big. hamas said it was their work, and from their base in gaza rejected any compromise with israel. the palestinian president has a little room for maneuver with his own people divided. he has threatened to walk out of negotiations if israel presumes building when the partial ban ins at the end of this month. the post says that a middle east peace is in the national interest of america, and despite
that these sanctions have been a blessing in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not
and john elderfield take us on a tour of a new matisse exhibit at the museum of modern art. >> it's a period when matisse really seemed to have very intently stopped the kind of work he was doing before and began searching for something and we can chart him through the evolution of "bathers by a river" in fact and then i think through "the exhibition" trying different modes of painting. bringing together different styles, avant-garde styles of the time, ways of making the surface of works very different and reworked. and we watch him not sure where he's going but excited about the possibility of a new kind of art for himself and we feel that for matisse that was a kind of radical invention. he said about "bathers by a river" and "moroccans" that they were two of the most pivotal works of his career. i think it's important he used the word "pivotal" and not "important." it suggests there was a change that those works brought about in his career and i think that's part of what that radical invention is about. >> i think this was someone who had regularly changed but had done so in t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 169 (some duplicates have been removed)